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THE WTO: THE WTO BUILDING

Works of art

Many works of art and decorative items have been donated by countries and institutions over the years, to complement the designs of the original building.

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The WTO building
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The two imposing statues on either side of the main entrance to the building represent “Peace” (left side) and “Justice”. They were sculpted by the Geneva artist Luc Jaggi in 1925. “Peace” has a child bearing an olive branch and “Justice” is firmly seated on a serpent.


Depictions of “Peace” (left) and “Justice” (right) flank the main entrance to the home of the WTO

 

The Delft ceramic panel by the Dutch illustrator Albert Hahn Jr. is situated behind the reception desk in the building's entrance hall. The panel consists of over 2,000 individual tiles.


The Delft panel (1926) by Albert Hahn Jr

 


Artist Maurice Denis putting finishing touches to
his mural “The Dignity of Labour” (1931)

A broad staircase takes the visitor from the reception area to the first floor landing, which is decorated on both sides with large murals depicting various trades, crafts and professions. On the east side wall the French artist Maurice Denis painted “The Dignity of Labour”.

On the west side of the landing the Irish artist Sean Keating continued in his mural the theme of representing labour in all its forms.


Mural representing labour (1961) by artist Sean Keating

 

Moving up the next flight of stairs brings the visitor to other visions of labour on land and sea, conceived in painted tiles by the Portuguese artist Jorge Colaço.


Tiled panel (1928) by Jorge Colaço


Large murals (1940) decorate the walls of the Salle des Pas Perdus. They are the work of the Swiss-French artist Gustave-Louis Jaulmes.


“Dans la joie universelle”, painting by Gustave-Louis Jaulmes, Salle des Pas Perdus.

“Le travail dans l'abondance”, painting by Gustave-Louis Jaulmes, Salle des Pas Perdus.

“Le bienfait des loisirs”, painting by Gustave-Louis Jaulmes, Salle des Pas Perdus.


 

To the right of the tiled fresco is the WTO Library, which is decorated with fine woodwork and offers access to a unique collection of works on the multilateral trading system.


WTO Library


  

The open courtyard on the main floor of the CWR is occupied by an ornamental fountain conceived by the artist Gilbert Bayes.


 


WTO courtyard with “Child with Fish” fountain (1926)
by artist Gilbert Bayes