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MINISTERIAL CONFERENCES

NGO Centre Provisional Programme

NGO-organized activities and briefing sessions for NGOs will take place at the NGO Centre located in the Nusa Dua Conference Centre.

> Other NGO-Organized activities

NINTH MINISTERIAL CONFERENCE 2013
NGO CENTRE PROGRAMME
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PROVISIONAL

2 DECEMBER 2013
Time & location Organiser  Title/ Description

15:00-16:00
Tanjung Benoa Briefing Room

WTO Secretariat

Orientation briefing

3 DECEMBER 2013
Time & location Organiser  Title/ Description

11:30-13:00
Legian 8

International Digital Economy Alliance (IDEA)

Inside the Internet — the people and policies behind the world's trading platform

Over the past 18 years, the number of Internet users grew from 16 million to 2.75 billion, making it the ‘fastest growing technology in human history’, according to the UN. As it continues to expand access to markets, the Internet has effectively become the world’s trading platform, enabling the coordination of buyers and sellers, production flows, and financial resources at a global scale. As trade is increasingly dependent on the web, it is important for trade experts to understand what makes the Internet tick and how trade rules could help protect it.

The Internet’s forceful impact on the world is in many ways directly linked to its open structure, open standards and careful regulatory approach. From the outset, the Internet was designed with no gatekeepers and not central control over what, when and how services are consumed and by whom. Today, a web of organisations and processes ensure that the Internet remains interoperable, resilient and secure as its growth continues to accelerate.

However, the decentralized, bottom-up structure of the Internet is increasingly under pressure as countries want to gain more direct control over the network. In this context, the international trade community has a vital interest in protecting the core elements that make the Internet such a powerful trade enabler: Its open standards, open processes and the ability of Internet services to provide the best quality at the lowest cost to the greatest number of users.

In addition to providing an overview on the way in which the global Internet is managed, the workshop will explore different scenarios in which international trade agreements could be used to protect the open Internet. This includes mechanisms whereby national authorities would work with technical and trade bodies to set a floor for mutual commitments, e.g. in areas such as privacy, to be renegotiated on a regular basis. The Internet’s broad, bottom-up and expert-led organisations are ideally placed to provide the most current, state-of-the-art policy advice on a number of Internet-related issues. A model that provides them with a formal role would reconcile the need to protect the Internet as a global platform for trade with the need to preserve national sovereignty in a fast-moving policy environment.

 

Speakers and Moderator

  • Perry Robinson, VP Legal & Associate General Counsel, Rackspace Inc.
  • John Curran, CEO, American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN)
  • Nick Ashton-Hart, International Digital Economy Alliance (IDEA) - Moderator

11:30-13:00
Legian 3

Public Citizen

More information to be provided

13:00-14:20
Tanjung Benoa Meeting Room

International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) and Trade Union Confederation of America (TUCA)

 

Who makes the Digital Economy?

At the 9th Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organisation (WTO-MC9) several WTO Members will announce or continue the negotiations of an expansion of the Information Technology Agreement (ITA). The ITA is a 1997 WTO plurilateral agreement on trade in high-technology products. It covers 90 per cent of world trade in such products. Presently 78 countries are signatories to the ITA, however, a couple of dozens of them are negotiating the expansion of the agreement to cover a bulk of 200 new technology products for liberalization. The ITA and its expansion aim at achieving binding and eliminating duties and charges of any kind and addressing Non-Tariff Barriers (NTBs). In practice, studies show that only some of the original signatories of 1997 benefited and several countries decided to not partake in the negotiations of the expansion of the agreement. The International Trade Union Confederation invites you to a discussion on the negotiations and the Information Technology Agreement (ITA-II).

Protest letter to the ITA negotiating Parties

Speakers

  • Esther Busser, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)
  • Gopalakrishnan Manicandan, Our World Is Not For Sale (OWINFS)
  • Lise Rødland, Norwegian Trade Campaign
  • Adhemar Minheiro, Rede Brasileira pela Integração dos Povos – Brazilian Network for the Integration of Peoples (REBRIP) and Trade Union Confederation of America (TUCA)

18:00-19:30
Legian 9

 

Social Movements for an Alternative Asia (SMAA)

Press Conference: The end of growth and the future of the WTO

Time TBD
Tanjung Benoa Briefing Room

WTO Secretariat

Daily NGO briefing

4 DECEMBER 2013
Time & location Organiser  Title/ Description

10:00-11:30
Legian 3

Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES)

Make the right impact! Trade policies assessment and Human Rights

The multilateral trade and the human rights regime are both key in defining the nature of globalization. But despite calls for a “globalization with a human face” from former Director-General of the WTO, Pascal Lamy, trade policies and Human Rights issues are usually still discussed in isolation from each other. Yet, the international trade system has a profound impact on human rights, given that the promotion of economic growth in itself may not lead to inclusive, sustainable and equitable development outcomes. It has been widely criticized that trade agreements and investment treaties focus exclusively on commercial interests in negotiations without their obligations to address human rights, the environment and development. A powerful and nascent tool for evaluating the effects of trade policies is the Human Rights impact assessment (HRIAs). This event will explore the interaction between human rights and trade; analyze the possible negative impacts of WTO rules for the enjoyment of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; as well as discuss the state of play of human rights impact assessments within the field of multilateral trade. This panel is part of FES’ endeavor to bridge the topics of trade policies and Human Rights and with this eventually contribute to a more democratic and socially just globalization process.

Speakers

  • Jane Nalunga, Country Director, Southern and Eastern African Trade Information and Negotiation Institute, Uganda (SEATINI-Uganda);
  • Marina Durano, Assistant Professor, School of Economics, University of the Philippines;
  • Esther Busser, Assistant Director, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), Geneva Office
  • Matthes Buhbe, Director, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES) Geneva Office
  • Robert Howse, Lloyd C. Nelson Professor of International Law, New York University School of Law

10:00-11:30
Legian 8

Global Business Dialogue (GBD)

Bringing Bali Home

A Look at the Processes of Implementing the Hoped-For Bali Agreement in the United States and Selected Other Countries.

Speakers and Moderator

  • John Magnus, President, TradeWins
  • T.S. Vishwanath, Principal Adviser, APJ-SLG Law Offices, New Delhi
  • Pranav Kumar, Head, International Trade Policy, Confederation of Indian Industry (CII)
  • Greg Rushford, Editor and Publisher, The Rushford Report
  • John Murphy, Vice President, International Affairs, U.S. Chamber of Commerce - Moderator

11:30-12:30
Legian 1-2

Pro Humano Genere

Proposal: A global solution for the protection of inventions

> Event invitation

11:00-12:30
Legian 6-7

Third World Network (TWN)

WTO+ Features of the TPP and their Implications for the Multilateral Trading System

Cosponsors: AFTINET, Public Citizen, Citizen's Trade Campaign, Itsourfuture, RedGE, People's Action Against TPP, and Knowledge Ecology International

11:00-12:30
Legian 9

CUTS International

Trade facilitation: Identifying and addressing SMEs and consumers’ needs and considerations

As the WTO Bali Ministerial approaches, expectations regarding a potential Trade Facilitation (TF) outcome are starting to build up. While such a potential outcome is expected to complement efforts to reduce transaction cost of trading across borders, the specific interests of certain key stakeholders, such as SMEs and consumers, remain largely unaddressed. Facilitated flows of goods and relevant supporting services can improve the variety, quality and quantity of the offer, push down prices, and increase levels of competition thus benefitting consumers at all levels. SMEs are the “traders” that have less capacity to overcome customs, documentation and infrastructure barriers while remaining the larger employer in both developed and developing countries. These stakeholders have specific needs and considerations that still need to be addressed, whether in a future WTO TF deal or in the national implementation phase. Some of these needs have already been identified by CUTS in several multilateral and regional events. However, options to respond to these needs and considerations may greatly vary from country to country, among regions and according to levels of development. The main objective of this side event is to identify what are the key issues of interest to consumers and SMEs in TF in light of the experience of Members, international cooperation agencies and other key stakeholders. It will also seek to explore regulatory and institutional options to respond to those needs and considerations and on how a potential WTO TF outcome could contribute to consumer welfare and SMEs' competitiveness.

> Event summary

Speakers and moderator

  • Rajesh Aggarwal, Chief, Business and Trade Policy, International Trade Centre (ITC)
  • Ricardo James, Head, Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) – Geneva mission
  • Stephen Dietz, Australian Permanent Mission to the World Trade Organization (WTO), Geneva
  • Rashid S. Kaukab, Director, CUTS International, Geneva – Moderator

12:00-13:00
Legian 8

 

National Foreign Trade Council (NFTC)

Bali and Beyond: Business Perspectives on the WTO's Role in Promoting Global Trade in the 21st Century

The global marketplace has changed significantly over the past two decades, but the multilateral rules under the World Trade Organization have not. While businesses and governments are pursuing opportunities elsewhere to modernize trade rules, the private sector remains committed to improving the global framework to support trade in the 21st Century. Join business representatives to discuss the development of trade mechanisms to tackle 21st century global challenges, the importance of supporting small businesses and entrepreneurs who are increasingly participating in the global marketplace, and the role of online technologies and offline services in facilitating trade.

Speakers and moderator

  • Craig Kramer, Vice President International Government Affairs, Johnson & Johnson
  • Shiumei Lin, Vice President for Public Affairs, UPS Asia Pacific
  • Jennifer Sanford, Manager Government Affairs, Cisco Systems
  • Isabelle Neo, Government Relations, Southeast Asia, eBay
  • Jake Colvin, Vice President, National Foreign Trade Council (NFTC) – Moderator

12:30-14:00
Legian 1-2

Our World Is Not For Sale (OWINFS)

More information to be provided

13:45-15:00
Legian 6-7

 

International Digital Economy Alliance (IDEA)

The Internet and the rise of the globalised SME

The Internet has become the world’s trading platform in a process that saw production, distribution and consumption patterns being reshaped at a global level. The resulting markets are highly integrated, transparent, efficient and with low barriers to entry. With more than half a billion people connecting to the Internet the first time in the next two years, almost all of them in the global South, it is time to explore the impact of the networked economy on trade and development.

The way in which the Internet has empowered small and medium-sized enterprises, particularly in the developing world, is often-overlooked. While traditional models of trade relied on a vendor importing goods from a foreign supplier and selling them locally, today many merchants use the Internet to sell directly to foreign customers. Online marketplaces, payment systems, cloud computing applications and other online tools provide SMEs with instant access to global markets. As a result, SMEs are engaging in global trade at an unprecedented rate, with profound implications for the future of trade and development. 

Contrary to popular belief, SMEs in the developing world do not primarily use Internet services to reach developed-world markets. According to new research, they mostly use it to reach other developing markets - a trend with potentially far-reaching consequences for global trade and development.

However, the entry of SMEs into the global economy comes up against a trade system traditionally shaped by the needs of large multinational companies. To fully utilize the Internet’s potential for SMEs, and to ensure a level playing field for all businesses, irrespective of their size and location, modern trade rules need to protect the Internet as the foundation of global trade.

Some of the questions that will be addressed during the course of this session:

  • How do Internet services empower SMEs in practical terms?
  • What are scenarios for future developments: how will the networked economy and how will Internet-enabled SMEs impact markets, create growth and jobs?
  • International trade rules were originally created to serve the needs of large transnational companies. How does it need to change to support the export activities of Internet-enabled SMEs?
  • What are some of the trade barriers affecting cloud providers (e.g. local hosting requirements)? How do these regulations affect cloud business models and do they achieve their intended purpose?

 

Speakers and Moderator

  • Perry Robinson, VP Legal & Associate General Counsel, Rackspace Inc.
  • Isabelle Neo, Southeast Asia Government Relations, eBay Inc.
  • Rod Drury, CEO and founder, Xero Inc.
  • Nick Ashton-Hart, International Digital Economy Alliance (IDEA) - Moderator

14:00-15:30
Legian 8

World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)

The link between supply chains and WBCSD Action2020 business

Main areas reviewed: climate change, ecosystems, agriculture & water

14:00-15:30
Tanjung Benoa Meeting Room

Pacific Network on Globalization (PANG)

More information to be provided

15:00-16:30
Legian 3

Agence Africaine de Coopération et d'Information pour le Commerce International (AACICI)

Comment favoriser une meilleure insertion du Sénégal dans le Système Commercial Multilatéral?

L'Agence Africaine de Coopération et d'Information pour le Commerce International (AACICI) compte ainsi susciter les réflexions pour permettre au Sénégal de mieux intégrer le Système Commercial Multilatéral à travers les flexibilités, mécanismes et instruments offerts par l'OMC.

À ce titre, les communications vont porter sur:

— L'élaboration d'un cadre stratégique pour le développement du commerce des services au Sénégal à travers la dérogation relative aux services  pour les PMA;

— La présentation de l'Institut Africain des Politiques Commerciales (IAPC): C'est un programme innovant qui vise à créer une masse critique d'intellectuels africains qui comprennent les politiques et négociations commerciales internationales. Cette communication va mettre l'accent sur le Master Facilitation des Echanges en relation avec la Conférence Ministérielle.

Intervenants

  • Dr Falou Samb, Ancien délégué du Sénégal à l'Organisation Mondiale du Commerce (OMC), Directeur Exécutif de l'Agence Africaine de Coopération et d'Information pour le Commerce International (AACICI)
  • Shanker Das Bairagi, Ambassadeur et Représentant Permanent du Népal auprès de l'Organisation Mondiale du Commerce (OMC), Coordinateur du Groupe des pays les moins avancés (PMA)
  • Mouhamadou Moustapha Thioub, Secrétaire Général de l'Agence Africaine de Coopération et d'Information pour le Commerce International (AACICI)

15:00-16:30
Legian 5

Washington International Trade Association (WITA)

What will a Post-Bali Agenda for the WTO look like?

Much is at stake at the 9th WTO Ministerial Conference. The Bali Negotiations have been repeatedly referred to “as the crucial moment”, “the turning point” and “the brink of the international trading system”.  Few fail to recognize the magnitude of the challenges that await negotiators in Bali. And these challenges for Bali are diverse. On the one hand, most developed countries expect to move beyond the Doha Development Agenda, setting aside deadlocked issues to achieve solid progress on different packages of deliverables, such as services, intellectual property and trade facilitation. On the other, there remains the persistent developing country concern that an Agreement in Bali cannot lose sight of the traditional “development issues” that have stalled negotiations in the past. Developing and Least Developing Country (LDCs) expectations are high on matters of industrial tariffs, multilateral services liberalization and new market access for agriculture. Special safeguard clauses as well such as the G-33 proposal to allow governments more policy-space to create and operate food reserves are also in the spotlight. What about a Post-Bali Agenda? How will it conciliate developing countries' interests while also attending to the new matters that have emerged since 2001? What a “Bali Package” will look like, in this context, is still hard to predict.  This panel will address some of the issues that may arise from a Post-n unclear “Bali Package”. 1) Should Members fail to agree on a development-based approach to the negotiations? What will the consequences be to Doha Round negotiation? What issues and texts, if any, should be carried over from Doha? 2) What will happen to the multilateral trading system should new issues fail to be included in the negotiations issues should be considered from post-1995 Free Trade Agreements? 3) What would a Post-Bali Agenda look like? Should the Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA) and the WTO Dispute Settlement System be brought to the table?

 

Speakers and moderator

  • Jake Colvin, Vice President, Global Trade Issues, National Foreign Trade Council (NFTC)
  • Tom Harris, Chairman of the European Services Forum and Vice Chairman, Asia, Standard Chartered Bank
  • Rashid S. Kaukab, Director, CUTS International, Geneva
  • Ulrike Schmuelling, Senior Advisor, German Chemical Industry Association (VCI), Brussels
  • Ada Siqueira, Fellow, Institute of International Economic Law, Georgetown Law Center, Brazilian Trade Lawyer
  • Gary Horlick, Law Offices of Gary N. Horlick, U.S. Trade Lawyer – Moderator

15:30-18:30
Legian 6-7

Social Movements for an Alternative Asia (SMAA)

The failure of the WTO and alternatives from the People for Economic Justice

16:30-18:00
Legian 3

Great Mission Group Consultancy (GMGC)

GIs and Export Subsidies

Time TBD
Tanjung Benoa Briefing Room

WTO Secretariat

Daily NGO briefing

5 DECEMBER 2013
Time & location Organiser  Title/ Description

11:00-12:30
Legian 8

Pacific Network on Globalization (PANG)

More information to be provided

12:30-14:00
Tanjung Benoa Meeting Room

 

Public Services International (PSI)

Trade In Services Agreement: The dangers of liberalising services

Public Services International is pleased to present a panel of distinguished experts to discuss the risks and problems with radical liberalisation of services. The Trade in Services Agreement is a significant departure from the usual multilateral process. Comprised of only a small portion of the WTO members it aims to significantly liberalise trade in services that are predominantly provided by large multinational corporations. However the agreement risks deregulating sectors of the economy that are regulated for good reason. Public services, environmental services and financial markets all operate with significant public interest components. Water, energy, health and education are but a few examples of sectors where market provision cannot achieve the social objectives governments, and the people they represent, demand. The recent financial crisis makes clear the profound risks of under-regulated financial markets. This panel discussion will ask why a new services agreement is required. Why must it be negotiated in secrecy outside the multilateral process? Why are so many developing countries refusing to participate and what benefit will it provide to the majority of the community?

Speakers and Moderator

 

  • Sanya Reid Smith, Legal Advisor and Senior Researcher, Third World Network (TWN)
  • Daniel Bertossa, Senior Policy and Advocacy Officer, Public Services International (PSI)
  • Melinda St Louis,  International Programs Director, Public Citizen: Global Trade Watch
  • Jane Kelsey, Professor of Law, University of Auckland
  • Faizel Ismail, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of South Africa to the World Trade Organization (WTO) (tbc)
  • Michael Whaites, New South Wales
  • Esther Busser, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)
  • Rosa Pavanelli, General Secretary, Public Services International (PSI) – Moderator

12:30-14:00
Legian 3

FIATA

Press Briefing

Technical briefing on the Montreal Convention 1999

14:00-15:30
Legian 1-2

 

World Farmers' Organisation (WFO)

World farmers call for world leaders to give fresh momentum to the multilateral trading system at the 9th WTO Ministerial

 

Farmers will need to increase production significantly if future demand for food is to be met. Indeed, the world’s population is estimated to reach 9.1 billion by 2050. Yet the world’s resources of land and water are finite. In addition, farmers are facing more extremes of climate and long-term shifts in growing conditions, while price volatility is also on the increase. This is why food security is becoming of increasing concern. International trade is one important way of evening out supply and demand imbalances but farmers need a fair, transparent and predictable trading environment in order to operate effectively. The World Farmers’ Organisation believes that an agreement on rules of trade at a multilateral level is the best way to achieve this objective and ensure the greatest benefit for the widest population and therefore strongly supports the World Trade Organization. Farmers therefore call on world leaders to give fresh momentum to the multilateral process by reaching a balanced agreement and work program at this week’s WTO Ministerial meeting. It is not only important that the Ministerial tackle some long-standing trade problems but also look for solutions to new challenges, such as the increasing concern about food security, in ways which do not result in trade distortions. The World Farmers’ Organisation brings to attention its trade policy position adopted by farm organizations throughout the world in April 2013. The WFO is committed to the pursuit of ambitious trade policy objectives guided by basic principles which ensure that farmers throughout the world can fulfil their wider economic, social and environmental role and that the special needs of the least developing countries are taken into account. WFO is calling for actions to reinforce the global trading systems by strengthening international standards, reducing protectionist measures, encouraging capacity building, increased transparency and predictability of agricultural markets, and ensure farmers benefit from the opening of markets. The WFO calls on world leaders in Bali to set out a clear work program for 2014 which will ensure concrete progress in this direction.

14:00-15:30
Legian 9

Indonesia for Global Justice (IGJ)

Dialogue between the Indonesian Trade Minister, Gita Wiryawan, and civil society. The aim of the event is to present the concerns of civil society around WTO issues and also to present the inputs for the G-33 proposal.

Speakers

  • Gita Wiryawan, Trade Minister of the Republic of Indonesia
  • Riza Damanik, Executive Director of Indonesia for Global Justice (IGJ)
  • Dr. Ivan A. Hadar, Board of Indonesia for Global Justice (IGJ)

14:30-16:00
Legian 3

IBON International

Development Justice

15:00-16:30
Legian 8

Global Business Dialogue (GBD)

Development and National Interests: Lessons from the Doha Round

Speakers and Moderator

  • Selina Jackson, Special Representative to the United Nations and the World Trade Organization (WTO), The World Bank, Geneva
  • T.S. Vishwanath, Principal Adviser, APJ-SLG Law Offices, New Delhi
  • Pranav Kumar, Head, International Trade Policy, Confederation of Indian Industry (CII)
  • Craig Kramer, Vice President, Johnson & Johnson
  • Richard O. Cunningham, Partner, Steptoe & Johnson
  • R. K. Morris, President, The Global Business Dialogue (GBD) - Moderator

15:30-17:00
Legian 9

Social Movements for an Alternative Asia (SMAA)

The geopolitics of free trade: links between TPP FTA and WTO

16:00-17:30
Legian 3

IBON International

Press Conference

Time TBD
Tanjung Benoa Briefing Room

WTO Secretariat

Daily NGO briefing

6 DECEMBER 2013
Time & location Organiser  Title/ Description

11:30-13:00
Legian 8

Social Movements for an Alternative Asia (SMAA)

Press Conference: The Post-Bali Roadmap of the People

12:30-14:00
Legian 1-2

Arab NGO Network for Development (ANND)

More information to be provided

14:00-15:30
Legian 8

 

Resistance and Alternatives to Globalization (RAG)

WTO Global Value Chains and Indonesia

Time TBD
Briefing room

WTO Secretariat

Daily NGO briefing