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WTO: 2005 PRESS RELEASES

Press/406
19 May 2005
ANTI-DUMPING

WTO Secretariat reports declines in both new anti-dumping investigations and new final anti-dumping measures

The WTO Secretariat reported that in the period 1 July-31 December 2004, both the number of initiations of new anti-dumping investigations, and the number of new final anti-dumping measures applied, showed substantial declines compared with the corresponding period of 2003.

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For new measures, this continues the declining trend noted in the first half of 2004. In particular, during the July-December 2004 period, 17 Members initiated a total of 103 new investigations, down from 135 initiations in the corresponding period of 2003. As for new final anti-dumping measures, 15 Members applied a total of 91 new measures during the second half of 2004, a decline from the 108 measures applied during the second half of 2003. Twenty-six of the new initiations, and 23 of the new final measures, were by developed Members during the second half of 2004, down from 48 initiations and 24 new measures during the corresponding period of 2003.

Among Members initiating new investigations, the European Communities, with 17 initiations, was the Member reporting the highest number during July-December 2004. This represented an increase from the four initiations reported by the EC for July-December 2003. China, with 16 initiations during the second half of 2004, was in second place, also registering an increase over the 11 initiations it reported for the second half of 2003. India, in third place with 14 initiations of new investigations, registered a decline of more than fifty per cent from its 33 initiations during July-December 2003. Turkey was fourth, reporting 12 initiations, an increase from the 6 new investigations that it initiated during July-December 2003 levels. The United States, reporting four initiations of new investigations during the second half of 2004, compared with 21 during the second half of 2003, fell from second to seventh place (tying with Australia, Canada and Mexico) between these two periods. Argentina, Brazil, Indonesia, Israel, Korea, New Zealand, Peru, South Africa, and Thailand all initiated five or fewer new investigations during the second half of 2004.

China remains the most frequent subject of new investigations, with 25 initiations directed at its exports during July-December 2004. This level represents a significant decline from the 36 initiations directed at Chinese exports during the comparable period of 2003. Korea was the second most frequent subject, with 12 initiations of new investigations directed at its exports, an increase from the seven investigations to which Korean exports were subject in the second half of 2003. Brazil and Chinese Taipei, subject to six initiations each on their exports during the second half of 2004, were tied for third place, followed by Japan and the United States, each of which was subject to five initiations on its exports. Twenty-six other countries or customs territories had four or fewer investigations initiated on their exports during the second half of 2004.

The products that were the subject of new investigations during the second half of 2004 were led by products in the chemicals sector (28 initiations), followed by plastics (16 initiations), and base metals (12 initiations). Of the initiations on chemical products, China accounted for 13, with its remaining three investigations focusing on products in the plastics sector. India accounted for seven initiations on chemical products, and for five on plastics. The European Communities initiated 10 of its 17 investigations on products in the base metals sector, followed by three and two initiations, respectively, for chemical and plastic products.

Concerning application of new final anti-dumping measures, India headed the list during the second half of 2004, applying 23 of the 91 total new measures reported. This marked a decline in absolute terms, however, from the 32 new measures reported by India in the second half of 2003. Turkey, applying 12 new measures, held second place, and reported an increase from the seven new measures it applied during the second half of 2003. China reported applying the third-largest number of new measures in absolute terms, i.e., 10 new measures, but this was less than half of the 22 new measures applied by China in July-December 2003. Korea held fourth place, reporting nine new measures, up from four during the corresponding period of 2003. The United States (eight new measures), Indonesia (six new measures), and Mexico and Peru (four new measures each) ranked fifth through seventh.

Products exported from China remained the most frequent subject of new measures, accounting for 25 of the 91 total measures reported. The United States, whose products were the subject of nine new measures, was a distant second, followed by India and Korea in third place (eight measures each), Chinese Taipei in fourth place (seven measures), and the European Communities in fifth place (five measures). The products of 20 other countries or customs territories were subject to fewer than five measures each.

In terms of the sectoral breakdown, products in the chemicals sector were the most frequent subject of new measures during the second half of 2004, accounting for 29 of the 91 total new measures. In second place were products in the plastics sector, which were subject to 20 new measures. Products in the base metals sector were the subject of 15 new measures, while products in the textiles sector were the subject of 11 new measures. Of the 29 new measures on products in the chemicals sector, China applied 20, followed by India (which applied seven) and Korea (which applied four). India led in terms of new measures on products in the plastics sector, accounting for 13 of the 20 total measures, followed by Turkey (five).

The data reported above are taken from the semi-annual reports of Members to the Committee on Anti-Dumping Practices. The statistics are based on information from Members having submitted semi-annual reports for the relevant periods, and are incomplete to the extent that Members have not submitted reports or have submitted incomplete reports. For the purpose of these statistics, each investigation or measure reported covers one product imported from one country or customs territory.

The anti-dumping semi-annual reports by Members for the period 1 July-31 December 2004 can be found under document series (G/ADP/N/126).

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